Continuing Education:
NJSHA Annual Convention

2017 Convention Program

Thursday, April 27

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Session 1 - Differentiated Vocabulary Instruction (Teaching Word Retrieval Strategies) for Learners With Word Finding (WF) Difficulties - Part 1

Diane German, PhD, National Louis University

This presentation will present a differentiated approach to vocabulary instruction for learners with word finding (WF) difficulties. Part one will present characteristics of semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts will be presented. How to match specific retrieval strategies to learners’ WF error patterns will be modeled. Guidelines for selecting target vocabulary based on learners’ WF error patterns and words’ lexical factors will be provided. Digital videos demonstrating retrieval strategy instruction will be presented; technology recommendations will be made.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe the characteristics of semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts, explain the retrieval strategies appropriate for learners based on their WF error patterns and list the guidelines for selecting target vocabulary.

.15 CEUs; (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 2 - Preparing Professional Voice Users for the Big Stage - Part 1

Tom Burke, MS, CCC-SLP, Tom Burke Voice Studio

Professional singers and speakers need to command many skills to successfully navigate the versatile demands of their careers. These skills include a mastery of content development, code-switching for different context and connecting to audiences through nuanced use of voice and body. In this three-part presentation, you will learn how to apply familiar speech/voice therapy concepts to training professional voice users for large stage events from theater productions to TED talks. The session will be a combination of lecture, group work with other participants and masterclass. Participants will have an opportunity to work on their own skills and practice coaching others..

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand a three-pronged framework for working with professional voice users, use basic phonemic prompts to coach clients to sing in at least three familiar styles of American music, identify missing components in traditional narrative structure which undermine successful speeches, and understand how to apply resonant voice therapy techniques, diction rules and overtone singing to improving ease and intensity of vocal projection in non-injured speakers.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Advanced)

Session 3 - CDysphagia Management in EOL Care - Part 1

Margaret Shafer, MA, CCC-SLP, Abington and Lansdale Hospitals, Abington Jefferson Health

The role of dysphagia management in end-of-life (EOL) care is often undervalued by physicians, nurses and even by the speech-language pathologists (SLPs) consulted (or not!). This presentation will review how to conduct the case history for background information and to assist with prognostication. It will review scripting for introductions to patients and families, explanations of the clinical swallow evaluation and for review of test results and implications. Pros and cons of instrumental evaluation will be discussed. Decisions for NPO (and its social/emotional implications for patients and families) versus comfort feeding, "we are going to let the patient eat whatever they want," and the need to discuss disposition will be addressed. Recognition of grief reactions and implications for family decision-making will be discussed. The SLP's role with the palliative care team and hospice and our scope of practice will be reviewed. Risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and potential outcomes will be discussed along with scripting to present these issues to families. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate application to the real life scenarios we encounter daily in health care. Special populations and outcomes will be addressed including dementia, end-stage cancers and stroke.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to perform a multi-system analysis during the case history review and identify significant factors for prognosis of outcomes, identify the differences between palliative care and hospice, state the stages of grief as defined by Elisabeth Kubler Ross, and identify steps of the clinical swallow evaluation to maximize information gleaned and preserve patient safety and comfort.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Session 4 - Got R Problems? A Phonemic Approach to /r/ Remediation

Christine Ristruccia, MS, CCC-SLP, Say It Right

Frustrated with treating /r/ disorders? This presentation offers a new and refreshing approach to treat the most difficult of sounds. Backed with extensive research and field testing, a complete phonemic approach to evaluating and treating /r/ is presented based on the 32 different types of /r/.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand the benefits of evaluating and treating /r/ phonetically, identify at least three specific articulation techniques to elicit the /r/ phoneme, recognize how to phonetically evaluate and treat the various word positions of the six vocalic /r/'s and identify the six /r/ controlled vowels.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

8:15 am - 9:45 am

Session 5 - Supervision in the Workplace - Part 1

Sue Hale, MCD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Theory and science of clinical education will serve as the foundation for a discussion of strategies for student and clinical fellowship (CF) supervision. Issues associated with supervision in university training facilities as well as the specific challenges associated with supervision in the busy workplace will be addressed. Participants will have opportunities to discuss supervision dilemmas.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to supervise students and CFs based on scientific and professional principles, utilize strategies for supervision relevant to the work setting and its demands and provide solutions to setting-specific supervisory dilemmas.

.15 CEUs; (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 6 - Medical, Dental, Therapeutic Intervention for the Child With Cleft Palate - Part 1

Helen Henkel, RN, CCM, Monmouth Medical Center; Naveen Ahuja, MD, Plastic Surgery Arts of New Jersey; Manolis Manolakakis, DMD, Advanced Facial Surgery; Greg Coakley, DDS, Two River Orthodontic; Alan Gertner, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA, Monmouth Medical Center and Kean University; Lauren Buhowski, MS, CCC-SLP, HealthSouth

Children born with cleft lips and palates typically require highly specialized care throughout their lives. They face a variety of complex health, social and emotional obstacles that are best managed by a transdisciplinary team. These team professionals work with the family to develop a unique, individualized treatment plan. By working with a team, the child and family receive comprehensive and coordinated services that result in optimal outcomes for each patient. This presentation is provided by members of the Monmouth Medical Center Regional Cleft Palate Team including a nurse coordinator, plastic surgeon, oral maxillofacial surgeon, orthodontist, audiologist and speech-language pathologist. Team members will discuss the process by which children born with clefts are managed, from their first days of life through initial medical/surgical procedures and throughout their infant, preschool and school years. Management of the feeding, resonance, articulation and hearing needs of these children, from infancy through their school years, will be addressed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify the early medical sequela that impact children born with cleft lips and palates, detail the benefits provided by having a team approach to the treatment of people with cleft lips and palates, describe the medical/surgical/orthodontic treatment strategies used to treat cleft lips and palates, recognize and recount speech-language treatments to improve feeding, resonance and articulation needs of children with cleft palates.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

10:00 am - 11:30 am

Session 7 - Differentiated Vocabulary Instruction (Teaching Word Retrieval Strategies) for Learners With Word Finding (WF) Difficulties - Part 2

Diane German, PhD, National-Louis University

This presentation will present a differentiated approach to vocabulary instruction for learners with word finding (WF) difficulties. Part one will present characteristics of semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts will be presented. How to match specific retrieval strategies to learners’ WF error patterns will be modeled. Guidelines for selecting target vocabulary based on learners’ WF error patterns and words’ lexical factors will be provided. Digital videos demonstrating retrieval strategy instruction will be presented; technology recommendations will be made.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe the characteristics of semantic and form based WF error patterns in single word and discourse contexts, explain the retrieval strategies appropriate for learners based on their WF error patterns and list the guidelines for selecting target vocabulary.

.15 CEUs; (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 8 - Preparing Professional Voice Users for the Big Stage - Part 2

Tom Burke, MS, CCC-SLP, Tom Burke Voice Studio

Professional singers and speakers need to command many skills to successfully navigate the versatile demands of their careers. These skills include a mastery of content development, code-switching for different context and connecting to audiences through nuanced use of voice and body. In this three-part presentation, you will learn how to apply familiar speech/voice therapy concepts to training professional voice users for large stage events from theater productions to TED talks. The session will be a combination of lecture, group work with other participants and masterclass. Participants will have an opportunity to work on their own skills and practice coaching others.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand a three-pronged framework for working with professional voice users, use basic phonemic prompts to coach clients to sing in at least three familiar styles of American music, identify missing components in traditional narrative structure which undermine successful speeches, and understand how to apply resonant voice therapy techniques, diction rules and overtone singing to improving ease and intensity of vocal projection in non-injured speakers.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Advanced)

Session 9 - Dysphagia Management in EOL Care - Part 2

Margaret Shafer, MA, CCC-SLP, Abington and Lansdale Hospitals, Abington Jefferson Health

The role of dysphagia management in end-of-life (EOL) care is often undervalued by physicians, nurses and even by the speech-language pathologists (SLPs) consulted (or not!). This presentation will review how to conduct the case history for background information and to assist with prognostication. It will review scripting for introductions to patients and families, explanations of the clinical swallow evaluation and for review of test results and implications. Pros and cons of instrumental evaluation will be discussed. Decisions for NPO (and its social/emotional implications for patients and families) versus comfort feeding, "we are going to let the patient eat whatever they want," and the need to discuss disposition will be addressed. Recognition of grief reactions and implications for family decision-making will be discussed. The SLP's role with the palliative care team and hospice and our scope of practice will be reviewed. Risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and potential outcomes will be discussed along with scripting to present these issues to families. Case studies will be presented to demonstrate application to the real life scenarios we encounter daily in health care. Special populations and outcomes will be addressed including dementia, end-stage cancers and stroke.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to perform a multi-system analysis during the case history review and identify significant factors for prognosis of outcomes, identify the differences between palliative care and hospice, state the stages of grief as defined by Elisabeth Kubler Ross, and identify steps of the clinical swallow evaluation to maximize information gleaned and preserve patient safety and comfort.

.15 CEUs; (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

10:15 am - 11:45 am

Session 10 - Supervision in the Workplace - Part 2

Sue Hale, MCD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Theory and science of clinical education will serve as the foundation for a discussion of strategies for student and clinical fellowship (CF) supervision. Issues associated with supervision in university training facilities as well as the specific challenges associated with supervision in the busy workplace will be addressed. Participants will have opportunities to discuss supervision dilemmas.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to supervise students and CFs based on scientific and professional principles, utilize strategies for supervision relevant to the work setting and its demands and provide solutions to setting-specific supervisory dilemmas.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 11 - Medical, Dental, Therapeutic Intervention for the Child With Cleft Palate - Part 2

Helen Henkel, RN, CCM, Monmouth Medical Center; Naveen Ahuja, MD, Plastic Surgery Arts of New Jersey; Manolis Manolakakis, DMD, Advanced Facial Surgery; Greg Coakley, DDS, Two River Orthodontic; Alan Gertner, PhD, CCC-A, F-AAA, Monmouth Medical Center and Kean University; Lauren Buhowski, MS, CCC-SLP, HealthSouth

Children born with cleft lips and palates typically require highly specialized care throughout their lives. They face a variety of complex health, social and emotional obstacles that are best managed by a transdisciplinary team. These team professionals work with the family to develop a unique, individualized treatment plan. By working with a team, the child and family receive comprehensive and coordinated services that result in optimal outcomes for each patient. This presentation is provided by members of the Monmouth Medical Center Regional Cleft Palate Team including a nurse coordinator, plastic surgeon, oral maxillofacial surgeon, orthodontist, audiologist and speech-language pathologist. Team members will discuss the process by which children born with clefts are managed, from their first days of life through initial medical/surgical procedures and throughout their infant, preschool and school years. Management of the feeding, resonance, articulation and hearing needs of these children, from infancy through their school years, will be addressed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify the early medical sequela that impact children born with cleft lips and palates, detail the benefits provided by having a team approach to the treatment of people with cleft lips and palates, describe the medical/surgical/orthodontic treatment strategies used to treat cleft lips and palates, recognize and recount speech-language treatments to improve feeding, resonance and articulation needs of children with cleft palates.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 12 - Therapy Ideas 365: A Year of Articulation and Phonology Intervention

Lisa Holland, MS, CCC-SLP, LanguageandLiteracyLinks

This presentation will demonstrate a variety of creative and fun therapy ideas using alliteration sound cards, literature, phonological awareness drills and the iPad for interventions with children. Examples and plans to address multiple individual education plan (IEP) goals for articulation and phonological awareness will be demonstrated to make therapy applicable and meaningful to the children. The presented techniques combine to allow students to make progress that they can build on at home, school and in conversational carryover. Hopefully this can inspire you and give you some great therapy ideas to take back and use immediately!

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to list favorite children’s authors and best books/materials for articulation therapy, document ideas for addressing multiple articulation IEP goals with a variety of students and create meaningful therapy plans for up to one school year.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 13 - SPicture Naming Is Not Enough: Deep Assessment in Word Finding Using the TWF-3

Diane German, PhD, National Louis University

This presentation will focus on the first step to strategic word finding (WF) intervention, differential diagnosis via deep assessment in WF. An explanatory theoretical model of lexical processing will be highlighted. Procedures for the differential diagnosis of semantic verses phonologically based WF errors will be presented. Deep WF assessment using the new Test of Word Finding, Third Edition (TWF-3) will be described.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe an explanatory model of lexical processing that presents the theoretical underpinnings of semantic and form based WF error patterns, list procedures for the differential diagnosis of semantic and form based WF error patters and explain deep assessment in WF using the new Test of Word Finding, Third Edition (TWF-3).

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 14 - Project Read Framing Your Thoughts Curriculum

Judith Fuhrman, MS, CCC-SLP, Language Circle Enterprises

Project Read Framing Your Thoughts Written Expression curriculum focuses on the art of sentence development using multisensory activities and sequential instruction to develop the basic skills of writing. Instruction centers on eight graphic symbols that explain sentence structure in a concrete, practical matter. These graphic symbols allow students to tactilely manipulate sentence design as they express thoughts and ideas in writing. Each sentence part is taught through direct instruction using visual, auditory, kinesthetic and tactile teaching strategies. The concepts and skills are taught sequentially and logically. The process teaches correct sentence structure and punctuation using students' own expressive language. Knowledge, understanding and analysis of sentence structure are powerful tools to increase reading comprehension, fluency and decoding text through context clues. The Written Expression process leads students from understanding the function of sentence parts to standard labels of parts of speech. These skills assist students with independent writing and help teachers meet state and national writing standards. Sentence structure is transferred to paragraph development illustrating how to shape five types of paragraphs. Each paragraph type is taught with unique graphic organizers and skill instruction. Students learn the standard paragraph construction, then master the ingredients needed to develop a specific type of paragraph. This curriculum provides strong editing pieces enabling students to write with responsible independence.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify teaching strategies using graphic symbols to assist students in developing an understanding of sentence structure to draft and revise in the writing process, understand a systematic, explicit and structured approach to teach sentence structure for comprehension and analysis of text, and recognize method that provides a common language for communicating with students for the purpose of improving or enhancing their writing skills.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

Session 15 - Preparing Professional Voice Users for the Big Stage - Part 3

Tom Burke, MS, CCC-SLP, Tom Burke Voice Studio

Professional singers and speakers need to command many skills to successfully navigate the versatile demands of their careers. These skills include a mastery of content development, code-switching for different context and connecting to audiences through nuanced use of voice and body. In thisthree-part presentation, you will learn how to apply familiar speech/voice therapy concepts to training professional voice users for large stage events from theater productions to TED talks. The session will be a combination of lecture, group work with other participants and masterclass. Participants will have an opportunity to work on their own skills and practice coaching others.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand a three-pronged framework for working with professional voice users, use basic phonemic prompts to coach clients to sing in at least three familiar styles of American music, identify missing components in traditional narrative structure which undermine successful speeches, and understand how to apply resonant voice therapy techniques, diction rules and overtone singing to improving ease and intensity of vocal projection in non-injured speakers.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Advanced)

Session 16 - Identification of Medical and Social Issues Compromising Dysphagia Care

Margaret Shafer, MA, CCC-SLP, Abington and Lansdale Hospitals, Abington Jefferson Health

The problem-solving process requires the skills of assessment (systematic collection of data relating to patients and their problems), problem identification (analysis of data), planning goals of care, implementation (putting the plan into action) and evaluation (assessing the effectiveness of the plan and adapting the plan for current patient needs). The assessment of swallowing function by examination of oral-pharyngeal structures and function is noted on the typical dysphagia evaluation form. Identification of pertinent contributory factors: past illness with special attention to recurrent events, current medical status, social/environmental issues, pharmacologic interactions are crucial components of a complete evaluation. This information is drawn from sources outside of speech-language pathology's traditional knowledge base. Understanding of medical terminology is a necessity in review of the medical chart, but it is not included as requisite coursework in any graduate program in speech pathology. Particular knowledge of the neurologic, gastroenterology (GI), respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and endocrine systems is critical in the decision-making process of dysphagia management. In addition, systems need to be evaluated along the age continuum. Finally, some knowledge of disease processes is necessary. This session was developed with two tracks in mind: a model for the supervising clinician who is training new students and for graduate student clinicians. While the information being presented may be routine and familiar, our hope is that it is an organized format for education.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify a cardiac condition that could limit a patient's ability to perform swallowing exercises and compensatory strategies, identify hematologic (blood) lab values that could limit a patient's endurance for therapy and mealtime, identify the impact of different stroke locations on swallowing function, identify four components in the case history that will impact the plan of care for feeding a patient.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Session 17 - Therapy Ideas 365: A Year of Language and Literacy Intervention - Part 1

Lisa Holland, MS, CCC-SLP, LanguageandLiteracyLinks

This presentation will demonstrate a variety of creative and fun therapy ideas using literature, crafts, story narratives, writing and the iPad for interventions with children. Examples and plans to address multiple individual education plan (IEP) goals for language (vocabulary, comprehension, figurative language and pragmatics) and literacy (writing, narrative structure) will be demonstrated to make therapy applicable and meaningful to the children. The presented techniques combine to allow students to make connections that they can build on at home, school and in their own minds in an expressive way. Hopefully this can inspire you and give you some great therapy ideas to take back and use immediately!

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to list favorite children’s authors and their best books/ideas for language and literacy therapy, document ideas for addressing multiple language and literacy IEP goals with a variety of students and create meaningful therapy plans for up to one school year.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 18 - Ethics in Practice: An Update on the Clinicians' Ethical Responsibilities - Part 1

Heather Bupp, Esq., American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

This presentation will include an introduction and historical discussion of practice restrictions, such as codes of conduct, codes of ethics, regulations and laws. A discussion of specific revisions to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics applicable to clinical practice, research, supervision, reporting and practice management. A presentation of the Board of Ethics complaint adjudication process, sanctions, and trends in types of violations found. Real-life scenarios will be presented in practice, research, supervision and management scenarios with strategies for resolution of code violations. Implications for clinicians' practice management of confidentiality, support personnel, conflicts of interest, ethical treatment of linguistically diverse populations and special considerations for students/children with custody or other legal issues will be discussed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to delineate key considerations and appropriate timing in resolving ethical dilemmas, implement the 2016 revisions to the ASHA Code of Ethics as part of the daily practice of speech-language pathology and audiology, understand when and how to self-report or disclose as well as appropriately report ethical violations by colleagues and recognize ethical versus legal versus regulatory (state/local) standards.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

2:15 pm - 3:45 pm

Session 19 - Life After Graduation: Finding the Best CF Experience

Karen Bilbao, MA, CCC-SLP, EBS Healthcare

0 CEUs (Instructional Level – Introductory)

EBS is dedicated to improving services and support within the birth to 21-year-old population and the communities in which they live. It is our responsibility, as the global leader in our field, to share knowledge and create awareness within the speech and language community. The goal of this presentation is to provide valuable services and resources to new and future graduates. As part of our commitment, we wish to give new graduates the necessary tools to execute an effective job search. With these tools, they will be prepared to find the perfect program for their individualized clinical fellowship (CF) experience. Our knowledgeable staff of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)-accredited speech-language pathologists and human resources representatives will address many of the common questions and concerns new graduates face throughout the search for their perfect CF program.

t the completion of this session, participants will be able to list three reputable sources for job searching, identify questions to ask during interviews and identify at least three needed factors when looking for your next employment position.

No CEUs Available, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

3:15 pm - 4:45 pm

Session 20 - Therapy Ideas 365: A Year of Language and Literacy Intervention - Part 2

Lisa Holland, MS, CCC-SLP, LanguageandLiteracyLinks

This presentation will demonstrate a variety of creative and fun therapy ideas using literature, crafts, story narratives, writing and the iPad for interventions with children. Examples and plans to address multiple individual education plan (IEP) goals for language (vocabulary, comprehension, figurative language and pragmatics) and literacy (writing, narrative structure) will be demonstrated to make therapy applicable and meaningful to the children. The presented techniques combine to allow students to make connections that they can build on at home, school and in their own minds in an expressive way. Hopefully this can inspire you and give you some great therapy ideas to take back and use immediately!

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to list favorite children’s authors and their best books/ideas for language and literacy therapy, document ideas for addressing multiple language and literacy IEP goals with a variety of students.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

Session 21 - Ethics in Practice: An Update on the Clinicians' Ethical Responsibilities - Part 2

Heather Bupp, Esq., American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

This presentation will include an introduction and historical discussion of practice restrictions, such as codes of conduct, codes of ethics, regulations and laws. A discussion of specific revisions to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Code of Ethics applicable to clinical practice, research, supervision, reporting and practice management. A presentation of the Board of Ethics complaint adjudication process, sanctions, and trends in types of violations found. Real-life scenarios will be presented in practice, research, supervision and management scenarios with strategies for resolution of code violations. Implications for clinicians' practice management of confidentiality, support personnel, conflicts of interest, ethical treatment of linguistically diverse populations and special considerations for students/children with custody or other legal issues will be discussed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to delineate key considerations and appropriate timing in resolving ethical dilemmas, implement the 2016 revisions to the ASHA Code of Ethics as part of the daily practice of speech-language pathology and audiology, understand when and how to self-report or disclose as well as appropriately report ethical violations by colleagues and recognize ethical versus legal versus regulatory (state/local) standards.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

3:15 pm -5:15 pm

Session 22 - An Internet-Based Model for Interdisciplinary Teams: Experts Without Borders

Karen Golding-Kushner, PhD, CCC-SLP, The Golding-Kushner Speech Center, LLC, and The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, Inc.; Robert J. Shprintzen, PhD, CCC-SLP, The Virtual Center for Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome, Inc.; Margaret Davino, JD, RN,BSN, Partner, Fox Rothschild, LLP

We describe a novel "Virtual Team" approach to facilitating best care for velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and other craniofacial disorders while providing accessible resources to professionals, without the geographic limitations of a traditional institutionally-based team approach. This allows the selection of expert clinicians from anywhere to provide vital information to cases residing anywhere. The model could easily be applied to treatment of other disorders. The model we present, the Virtual Center for VCFS and Other Craniofacial Disorders, is a charitable not-for-profit organization that represents an innovative approach to establishing interdisciplinary informational programs that function without walls or geographic boundaries, allowing the recruitment of experts from anywhere in the world. Costs for this model are exceptionally low, and efficiency exceptionally high with a major educational component included that benefits families and community-based medical and educational professionals. Specialists interested in this model must be aware of legal issues, including licensure and HIPAA, that are as integral to telepractice as they are to office-based intervention, and how to apply these regulations to the virtual model. The course will explain coordinating interdisciplinary teams using the Internet and long-distance communication with a team assembled from diverse international locations; Using telecommunications, usually video conferencing, to effectively provide direct or indirect guidance to individuals, including information relevant to speech and language development and treatment of communication disorders to families and community health care and educational professionals; and legal issues associated with using video conferencing for this type of program locally, nationally and internationally.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to state the legal, privacy and security issues involved with telepractice, including HIPAA considerations, consent and potential state law issues that must be addressed prior to using video conferencing or other forms of telepractice including licensing issues, professional misconduct allegations and malpractice considerations, explain how the legal implications for the use of the internet in the administration of clinical care differs from the use of the internet to transmit information, implement a model that utilizes video conferencing technology that is also used in telemedicine to assist people in obtaining care based on best practice and in the education of other professionals, and explain the role of the speech-language pathologists and apply the skills needed in facilitating parent and professional training to improve speech and language skills for children through a virtual center.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 23 - The Clinic Model for AAC Evaluations

Mary Anne Korth, MA, CCC-SLP, Hawkswood School; Katherine Tappan-Verderosa, MS, CCC-SLP, Hawkswood School

Fitting students with appropriate assistive technology can be challenging. Using a clinic model can help to reduce the frustration of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and collaborative team. By creating short term attainable goals and monitoring progress through regular follow ups, we can have successful outcomes using assistive technology with our students.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to learn to create attainable student goals towards the use of AAC, identify useful tools for evaluating communication skills, understand different modes of communication from low tech to high technology systems, and understand the process of follow-ups and modifying existing plans and explain through use of videos and open conversation.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 24 - Same Audiogram, Different Ages: Aural (Re)habilitation Across the Lifespan - SESSION WITHDRAWN

Session 25 - Tele-ReACH and The COMPASS Project: Using Tele-intervention and LENA Technology to Enhance Early Intervention for Babies With Hearing Loss

Kaitlin Hoy, MA, Sound Start Babies - Mountain Lakes EIP; Kayley Mayer, MA, Sound Start Babies - Mountain Lakes EIP; Lorraine Solimine, AuD, CCC-A, Sound Start Babies - Mountain Lakes EIP

While the benefits of specialized early intervention for babies with hearing loss is well documented, there is a local and national shortage of qualified providers who meet the standards described by the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (JCIH) to provide this care. Travel distance, scheduling conflicts, inclement weather and illness in the family of the child with hearing loss are all barriers to consistent effective service provision. With these concerns in mind, and wanting to include as many family members as possible in the program, Sound Start Babies initiated a teleintervention project, Tele-ReACH (Reaching All Children with Hearing Loss) with approval from the state early intervention system. The Tele-ReACH team includes speech-language pathologists, a pediatric audiologist, teachers of the deaf, occupational and physical therapists and a variety of consultants from other disciplines. All team members are knowledgeable about babies with hearing loss and able to provide options including listening and spoken language and total communication. The team audiologist working in collaboration with the child's physician and audiologist can use teleintervention to troubleshoot and guide the use of various amplification systems including post-auricular hearing aids, bone anchored hearing implants (BAHAs) and cochlear implants ensuring that the babies have optimal auditory access that is critical for language and speech development, as well as provide family training. This presentation will describe the practical steps in planning and initiating treatment sessions, maintaining a team approach, assessing parent satisfaction and measuring outcomes. The advantages and barriers that have been encountered will be discussed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify the various technologies that can be used for teleintervention, identify security concerns and technologies that mitigate these concerns when using teleintervention, prepare outcome statements for individual family service plans (IFSPs) when using teleintervention and list three benefits to providing teleintervention for babies with hearing loss.

.2 CEU, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Friday, April 28

7:30 am - 8:30 am

Session 26 - Stretch Your Knowledge of Telepractice: Regulation and Reimbursement

Susan Adams, Esq., American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

In this session, participants will learn about the practice considerations and reimbursement issues in providing services using telepractice. The benefits of telepractice service delivery, barriers to practice, licensing considerations, reimbursement and coverage issues including Medicaid will be highlighted.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of Medicaid reimbursement currently with telepractice in at least two states, identify two licensure requirements and two barriers to practice, and list two resources available to assist with telepractice implementation, licensure and regulation.

.1 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

8:45 am - 10:15 am

Session 27 - Evidence-Based Treatment Methods for Students Who Stutter - Part 1

Diane Games, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-Fluency, Private Practice

This session will begin with an overview and definition of stuttering followed by a review of evidence-based treatment methods for students who stutter including strategies for managing disfluencies. Information on child/teen centered treatment goals, student created impact charts and activities to achieve treatment goals and transfer of skills will be presented. In addition, The Process of Change Model (Prochaska, Norcross and DiClemente, 1992) will be reviewed. The process of change will be linked to issues that frequently impact student progress. Information on treatment will include a review of strategies to manage stuttering, ideas to address transfer of skills and ways to manage situational challenges. Frameworks and activities will be demonstrated along with activities to increase the length and complexity of stutter-free speech. Other issues addressed in this presentation will include activities to practice positive thinking, attitudes, manage emotions when speaking in certain situations. Other issues that will be discussed are locus of control, self-esteem and the cognitive thinking aspects of dealing with stuttering. Handouts designed for teachers/parents will be included in the presentation.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify critical factors in the diagnosis and treatment of stuttering, develop activities to facilitate transfer of skills into "real life" communication, develop an impact chart and treatment goals and review various approaches for treating a student who stutters.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 28 - Aphasia-Apraxia Therapy: Exploiting Neuroplasticity and Mindfulness - Part 1

William Connors, MA, CCC-SLP, Telepractice Certification Community, apahsiatoolbox.com

Despite the remarkable scientific advances in neuroplasticity, insufficient attention has been given to developing innovative tools and techniques to take optimal advantage of neural plasticity in efficient ways in the treatment of aphasia and related disorders. This presentation will demonstrate simple, effective, and adaptable treatment activities that emanate from the principles of neuroplasticity and mindfulness. The presenter will discuss the importance of incorporating evidence-based practice by extracting clinical and intellectually useful information, knowledge and tools from science and research in order to assist clients in their pursuit of their goals of improvement and recovery of propositional speech, language and communication in addition to increased overall functional independence. The presenter will also describe neuroplastic principles and innovative applications of neuroplasticity which allows for reconnective, restorative recovery while demonstrating the application of these philosophies in everyday practice, with individual clients of varying ages and severity levels, in group settings and in intensive aphasia programs. The incorporation of mindfulness in aphasia and apraxia treatment has been a crucial element to success in client recovery. The presenter will discuss the current research being conducted on mindfulness and rehabilitation. An easy, effective neuroplastic, mindful mantra developed by the presenter will be shared with the audience. This involves efficiently and effectively maximizing clients recovery of communication and cognitive skills by replacing learned non-use, non-attention and helplessness with propositional thought and communication turning people with aphasia into people recovering from aphasia.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify five key cognitive/mental processes that underpin and support language and its rehabilitation and incorporate these into treatment protocol development and application, identify five techniques for applying adult evidence-based rehabilitation techniques in working with adults, adolescents and young adults with communication problems, identify four observation and analysis techniques of aphasic client behavior to use in applying evidence-based treatment.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 29 - High-Functioning Autism: Proven and Practical Interventions for Challenging Behaviors in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults - Part 1

This intensive, full day presentation provides proven intervention strategies, essential treatment tools and behavioral techniques to help you analyze behaviors and actions, identify consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism (HFA). Walk away with practical intervention techniques for social success, behavior changes and overcoming challenging co-occurring behaviors that deliver success through adulthood. The challenging co-occurring issues to be addressed are social and communication, sensory, anxiety/rigidity/non-compliance, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD/ADD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and psychotropic medications. Gain valuable insight into common psychotropic medications, including both the helpful effects and potentially problematic side effects, that these individuals are prescribed. We will explore the advantage of pro-social punishment as a new idea to target and help make changes to difficult behaviors. Attendees will receive the tools necessary to gain effective collaboration between clinicians, educators and parents. Through case studies, video clips and class participation, attendees will leave this presentation with the confidence to identify actions that cause impediments in change, utilize more successful consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with HFA. Don't just manage these individuals; provide interventions that lead to successful independence into their adult years.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to explain how the DSM-5 updates impact service delivery, utilize several social skill interventions to improve long-term success for children/adolescents with HFA, employ specific coping and calming techniques for children/adolescents with HFA and select specific behavioral interventions that target the most difficult behaviors in children/adolescents with HFA.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 30 - Credentialing, Contracting, Coding and Billing Trends in Reimbursement - Part 1

Bopanna Ballachanda, PhD

Over the last few years, more and more insurance companies are recognizing hearing aids as a covered benefit for their beneficiaries. Additionally, many state and federal programs are providing hearing aid benefits, but funds are limited and access to these benefits can be restrictive. Challenges have always existed specific to insurance reimbursement. This presentation will provide the attendees an understanding of credentialing, contracting as these are the drivers and trends in reimbursement. The presenter will be sharing his successes learned from his multiple years of experiences working with third party payers. Information presented will include correctly establishing contracts with insurance companies, effectively credentialing practitioners to participate in third party plans. The presentation will address the coding and reimbursement issues. Helpful tips for handling an audit and responding to policy and procedural notices from insurance payors will be discussed. These key performance indicators are foundational for the success of a practice/facility.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify the credentialing by various insurance companies, understand and negotiate contract with various third party payors and use appropriate codes for audiology services and the reimbursements.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

9:00 am - 10:30 am

Session 31 - Selective Mutism: Evidence-Based Interventions - Part 1

Sharon Armstrong, PhD, La Salle University; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University; Cesar Ruiz, SLPD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University; Donna Spillman-Kennedy, MS, CCC-SLP, Integrated Speech Pathology, LLC

Speech-language pathologists (SLP) are integral to the assessment and treatment of children with selective mutism (SM). This population of children often exhibits various types of communication deficits related to consistent failure to speak in specific social settings where there is an expectation for speech, such as at school, despite speaking in other situations. SM interferes with educational achievement and social communication. Without special training, it can be difficult to gather vocalizations for formal analysis from children who typically do not speak. Using our innovative assessment method, we collected data on more than 140 children with SM over several years and will provide important information about the speech articulation, voice and receptive and expressive language difficulties that we discovered in these children. Thus we know that communication evaluations are challenging but necessary to best help these children use their voice in settings outside their comfort zone (such as school and other public places). This presentation begins with an overview of SM as an anxiety-based disorder affecting communication. Diagnostic characteristics of SM and core principles for working with these children and their families are provided along with specialized assessment practices and research findings from a validated testing process. Treatment strategies including Shipon-Blum’s evidence-based Social-Communication Anxiety Treatment (S-CAT), in addition to methods used for expanding spoken language with EXPRESS (EXPanding Receptive-Expressive Speaking Skills), and a new vocalization approach known as Freeing the Voice are demonstrated and discussed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to discuss the characteristics and diagnostic criteria associated with SM in accordance with the DSM V, identify the SLP’s role as a key team member and the benefits of using a team approach for treating children with SM, identify the steps for administering a speech language assessment for children with SM, discuss the S-CAT® philosophy and intervention approach, identify the physiological components of vocalization and their impact on verbalization for children with SM and identify levels of communication within the EXPRESS program for SM.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 32 - The Reading Evaluation - Part 1

Karen T. Kimberlin, MS, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Learning Connection, LLC

Oral language is the foundation that supports the development of reading and writing skills; thus, there is certainly a role for the speech-language specialist/pathologist in the reading evaluation process. We will review the components of a reading evaluation across different age/grade levels and describe the different profiles that might emerge after testing (i.e. dyslexia, hyperlexia, double-deficit, reading comprehension). The importance of spelling and writing analyses, whether through formal or informal assessment, will also be addressed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe the structures of oral language and their relationship to reading, describe the specific skill areas that need to be assessed to identify a dyslexia profile, state three reasons why it is important to consider/review writing samples when assessing reading and utilizing the Simple View of Reading, describe four types of reading profiles.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 33 - Project Read Phonics Curriculum - Part 1

Judith Fuhrman, MS, CCC-SLP, Language Circle Enterprises Endorsed Staff Development Provider

Project Read Phonics is a research-based curriculum and instructional methodology for students in Kindergarten through second grade. This curriculum leads teachers through a systematic order of phonics skills using visual, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile and body language teaching strategies. Each skill is presented using direct instruction. Lessons include multisensory activities, letter formation, vocabulary development, spelling generalizations, student practice exercises and reading materials for skill mastery. The lessons teach to transfer through sentence dictation and reading comprehension strategies. The Project Read Phonics program integrates decoding strategies, vocabulary development, narrative and expository reading processes, questioning strategies for higher-level processing and independent study skills.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand moving sequentially and systematically through the sounds and symbols of our language, recognize phonemic awareness strategies and identify multisensory strategies and activities for visual and auditory processing and retrieval.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session 34 - Evidence-Based Treatment Methods for Students Who Stutter - Part 2

Diane Games, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-Fluency, Private Practice

This session will begin with an overview and definition of stuttering followed by a review of evidence-based treatment methods for students who stutter including strategies for managing disfluencies. Information on child/teen centered treatment goals, student created impact charts and activities to achieve treatment goals and transfer of skills will be presented. In addition, The Process of Change Model (Prochaska, Norcross and DiClemente, 1992) will be reviewed. The process of change will be linked to issues that frequently impact student progress. Information on treatment will include a review of strategies to manage stuttering, ideas to address transfer of skills and ways to manage situational challenges. Frameworks and activities will be demonstrated along with activities to increase the length and complexity of stutter-free speech. Other issues addressed in this presentation will include activities to practice positive thinking, attitudes, manage emotions when speaking in certain situations. Other issues that will be discussed are locus of control, self-esteem and the cognitive thinking aspects of dealing with stuttering. Handouts designed for teachers/parents will be included in the presentation.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify critical factors in the diagnosis and treatment of stuttering, develop activities to facilitate transfer of skills into "real life" communication, develop an impact chart and treatment goals and review various approaches for treating a student who stutters.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 35 - Aphasia-Apraxia Therapy: Exploiting Neuroplasticity and Mindfulness - Part 2

William Connors, MA, CCC-SLP, Telepractice Certification Community, apahsiatoolbox.com

Despite the remarkable scientific advances in neuroplasticity, insufficient attention has been given to developing innovative tools and techniques to take optimal advantage of neural plasticity in efficient ways in the treatment of aphasia and related disorders. This presentation will demonstrate simple, effective and adaptable treatment activities that emanate from the principles of neuroplasticity and mindfulness. The presenter will discuss the importance of incorporating evidence-based practice by extracting clinical and intellectually useful information, knowledge and tools from science and research in order to assist clients in their pursuit of their goals of improvement and recovery of propositional speech, language and communication in addition to increased overall functional independence. The presenter will also describe neuroplastic principles and innovative applications of neuroplasticity which allows for reconnective, restorative recovery while demonstrating the application of these philosophies in everyday practice, with individual clients of varying ages and severity levels, in group settings and in intensive aphasia programs. The incorporation of mindfulness in aphasia and apraxia treatment has been a crucial element to success in client recovery. The presenter will discuss the current research being conducted on mindfulness and rehabilitation. An easy, effective neuroplastic, mindful mantra developed by the presenter will be shared with the audience. This involves efficiently and effectively maximizing clients recovery of communication and cognitive skills by replacing learned non-use, non-attention and helplessness with propositional thought and communication turning people with aphasia into people recovering from aphasia.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify five key cognitive/mental processes that underpin and support language and its rehabilitation and incorporate these into treatment protocol development and application, identify five techniques for applying adult evidence-based rehabilitation techniques in working with adults, adolescents and young adults with communication problems, identify four observation and analysis techniques of aphasic client behavior to use in applying evidence-based treatment.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 36 - High-Functioning Autism: Proven and Practical Interventions for Challenging Behaviors in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults - Part 2

Jay Berk, PhD, Jay Berk PhD and Associates

This intensive, full day presentation provides proven intervention strategies, essential treatment tools and behavioral techniques to help you analyze behaviors and actions, identify consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism (HFA). Walk away with practical intervention techniques for social success, behavior changes and overcoming challenging co-occurring behaviors that deliver success through adulthood. The challenging co-occurring issues to be addressed are social and communication, sensory, anxiety/rigidity/non-compliance, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD/ADD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and psychotropic medications. Gain valuable insight into common psychotropic medications, including both the helpful effects and potentially problematic side effects, that these individuals are prescribed. We will explore the advantage of pro-social punishment as a new idea to target and help make changes to difficult behaviors. Attendees will receive the tools necessary to gain effective collaboration between clinicians, educators and parents. Through case studies, video clips and class participation, attendees will leave this presentation with the confidence to identify actions that cause impediments in change, utilize more successful consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with HFA. Don't just manage these individuals; provide interventions that lead to successful independence into their adult years.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to explain how the DSM-5 updates impact service delivery, utilize several social skill interventions to improve long-term success for children/adolescents with HFA, employ specific coping and calming techniques for children/adolescents with HFA and select specific behavioral interventions that target the most difficult behaviors in children/adolescents with HFA.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 37 - Credentialing, Contracting, Coding and Billing Trends in Reimbursement - Part 2

Bopanna Ballachanda, PhD

Over the last few years, more and more insurance companies are recognizing hearing aids as a covered benefit for their beneficiaries. Additionally, many state and federal programs are providing hearing aid benefits, but funds are limited and access to these benefits can be restrictive. Challenges have always existed specific to insurance reimbursement. This presentation will provide the attendees an understanding of credentialing, contracting as these are the drivers and trends in reimbursement. The presenter will be sharing his successes learned from his multiple years of experiences working with third party payers. Information presented will include correctly establishing contracts with insurance companies, effectively credentialing practitioners to participate in third party plans. The presentation will address the coding and reimbursement issues. Helpful tips for handling an audit and responding to policy and procedural notices from insurance payors will be discussed. These key performance indicators are foundational for the success of a practice/facility.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify the credentialing by various insurance companies, understand and negotiate contract with various third party payors and use appropriate codes for audiology services and the reimbursements.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

10:45 am - 12:15 pm

Session 38 - Selective Mutism: Evidence-Based Interventions - Part 2

Sharon Armstrong, PhD, La Salle University; Evelyn Klein, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL, La Salle University; Cesar Ruiz, SLPD, CCC-SLP, La Salle University; Donna Spillman-Kennedy, MS, CCC-SLP, Integrated Speech Pathology, LLC

Speech-language pathologists (SLP) are integral to the assessment and treatment of children with selective mutism (SM). This population of children often exhibits various types of communication deficits related to consistent failure to speak in specific social settings where there is an expectation for speech, such as at school, despite speaking in other situations. SM interferes with educational achievement and social communication. Without special training, it can be difficult to gather vocalizations for formal analysis from children who typically do not speak. Using our innovative assessment method, we collected data on more than 140 children with SM over several years and will provide important information about the speech articulation, voice and receptive and expressive language difficulties that we discovered in these children. Thus we know that communication evaluations are challenging but necessary to best help these children use their voice in settings outside their comfort zone (such as school and other public places). This presentation begins with an overview of SM as an anxiety-based disorder affecting communication. Diagnostic characteristics of SM and core principles for working with these children and their families are provided along with specialized assessment practices and research findings from a validated testing process. Treatment strategies including Shipon-Blum’s evidence-based Social-Communication Anxiety Treatment (S-CAT), in addition to methods used for expanding spoken language with EXPRESS (EXPanding Receptive-Expressive Speaking Skills), and a new vocalization approach known as Freeing the Voice are demonstrated and discussed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to discuss the characteristics and diagnostic criteria associated with SM in accordance with the DSM V, identify the SLP’s role as a key team member and the benefits of using a team approach for treating children with SM, identify the steps for administering a speech language assessment for children with SM, discuss the S-CAT® philosophy and intervention approach, identify the physiological components of vocalization and their impact on verbalization for children with SM and identify levels of communication within the EXPRESS program for SM.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 39 - The Reading Evaluation - Part 2

Karen T. Kimberlin, MS, CCC-SLP, Speech Language Learning Connection, LLC

Oral language is the foundation that supports the development of reading and writing skills; thus, there is certainly a role for the speech-language specialist/pathologist in the reading evaluation process. We will review the components of a reading evaluation across different age/grade levels and describe the different profiles that might emerge after testing (i.e. dyslexia, hyperlexia, double-deficit, reading comprehension). The importance of spelling and writing analyses, whether through formal or informal assessment, will also be addressed.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe the structures of oral language and their relationship to reading, describe the specific skill areas that need to be assessed to identify a dyslexia profile, state three reasons why it is important to consider/review writing samples when assessing reading and utilizing the Simple View of Reading, describe four types of reading profiles.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 40 - Project Read Phonics Curriculum - Part 2

Judith Fuhrman, MS, CCC-SLP, Language Circle Enterprises Endorsed Staff Development Provider

Project Read Phonics is a research-based curriculum and instructional methodology for students in Kindergarten through second grade. This curriculum leads teachers through a systematic order of phonics skills using visual, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile and body language teaching strategies. Each skill is presented using direct instruction. Lessons include multisensory activities, letter formation, vocabulary development, spelling generalizations, student practice exercises and reading materials for skill mastery. The lessons teach to transfer through sentence dictation and reading comprehension strategies. The Project Read Phonics program integrates decoding strategies, vocabulary development, narrative and expository reading processes, questioning strategies for higher-level processing and independent study skills.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to understand moving sequentially and systematically through the sounds and symbols of our language, recognize phonemic awareness strategies and identify multisensory strategies and activities for visual and auditory processing and retrieval.

.15 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 41 - Students Who Stutter: Addressing Social Interactions and Negativity

Diane Games, MA, CCC-SLP, BCS-Fluency, Private Practice

This session will include treatment ideas to deal with social skills/interactions, negative comments about speech including teasing. In addition, activities to manage and modify negative thinking will be presented along with responses, comments and questions used in social interactions. This session will also address ideas to obtain carryover of skills. Activities to practice cognitive restructuring of beliefs about stuttering will be included. The impact of negative thinking on students who stutter will be discussed. Activities to practice cognitive restructuring of beliefs about stuttering will be reviewed. Sample of negative thoughts will be presented along with practice ideas to modify negative thoughts. The impact of negative thinking on students who stutter will be discussed. Ideas to develop assertiveness and carryover of skills into a number of speaking situations will be presented. This presentation will include a sample hierarchy of steps to practice ideas in each of these areas.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify social issues and treatment approaches to facilitate social language and social interactions, understand approaches to help a student modify negative thinking by identifying statement as either positive or negative and labeling speaking interactions as positive or negative, develop activities to practice carryover of speech skills and define assertiveness as related to speaking interactions.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 42 - Start Your Telepractice, Now!

William Connors, MA, CCC-SLP, Telepractice Certification Community, apahsiatoolbox.com

Telepractice, providing treatment and services from a distance, represents a growing opportunity in the field of rehabilitation. This session will introduce and offer practice in using tools for provision of services at a distance - telepractice. While the course will focus on technical and professional competencies required for conducting an actual session, regulatory, ethical and professional issues will also be addressed. Since these issues are fluid, resources on how to stay up to date will be provided.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify five platforms for the delivery of services by telepractioners, identify five resources for service provision by telepractice, identify five techniques for creating materials for telepractice sessions and. identify five issues related to inter- and intra-state licensure and the use of telepractice.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 43 - High-Functioning Autism: Proven and Practical Interventions for Challenging Behaviors in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults - Part 3

Jay Berk, PhD, Jay Berk PhD and Associates

This intensive, full day presentation provides proven intervention strategies, essential treatment tools and behavioral techniques to help you analyze behaviors and actions, identify consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with high-functioning autism (HFA). Walk away with practical intervention techniques for social success, behavior changes and overcoming challenging co-occurring behaviors that deliver success through adulthood. The challenging co-occurring issues to be addressed are social and communication, sensory, anxiety/rigidity/non-compliance, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD/ADD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and psychotropic medications. Gain valuable insight into common psychotropic medications, including both the helpful effects and potentially problematic side effects, that these individuals are prescribed. We will explore the advantage of pro-social punishment as a new idea to target and help make changes to difficult behaviors. Attendees will receive the tools necessary to gain effective collaboration between clinicians, educators and parents. Through case studies, video clips and class participation, attendees will leave this presentation with the confidence to identify actions that cause impediments in change, utilize more successful consequences for behaviors and teach new skills to children, adolescents and young adults with HFA. Don't just manage these individuals; provide interventions that lead to successful independence into their adult years.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to explain how the DSM-5 updates impact service delivery, utilize several social skill interventions to improve long-term success for children/adolescents with HFA, employ specific coping and calming techniques for children/adolescents with HFA and select specific behavioral interventions that target the most difficult behaviors in children/adolescents with HFA.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 44 - AAC: Understanding Core Vocabulary, Aided Language Instruction and LAMP

Catherine Fredericks, MA, CCC-SLP, Wayne Township Public Schools; Emily Laccona-McGrath, MS, CCC-SLP, Wayne Township Public Schools

This session provides an overview of core vocabulary, aided language instruction and language acquisition through motor planning (LAMP). The value of each approach is explained as it pertains to augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), and how each can be of benefit to AAC users at all levels of ability. Low tech and high tech examples will be provided. Challenges and options regarding implementation of these approaches within a school program will be discussed. Resources for further information will be provided.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify core vocabulary and explain the value of using core words as part of an AAC system, define aided language instruction and describe how it is used in AAC implementation, define the LAMP approach and give examples of how this approach can be used with both high and low tech equipment and identify a minimum of one way each approach can be integrated into a school program.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Introductory)

Session 45 - Bilingualism: Birth to Adulthood

Courtney Caruso, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Speech Associates LLC; Tatyana Elleseff, MA, CCC-SLP, Rutgers University, Smart Speech Therapy LLC

More than half of the world's population is bilingual so it is inevitable that we will encounter bilingual clients on our caseloads. Unfortunately, though, many speech-language pathologists within the United States and in New Jersey are monolingual and/or have not received sufficient training in the assessment and treatment of bilingual clients. The purpose of this presentation is to address common issues that may arise when working with bilingual children and adults with a variety of communication disorders and describe the best methods to appropriately assess and treat them.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to discuss limitations in using standardized assessments with bilingual clients, describe alternative assessment techniques for bilingual clients and explain research-based treatment approaches for bilingual individuals.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 46 - ANSD: What Do We Know For Sure?

Jeffrey Simmons, MA, CCC-A, Boys Town National Research Hospital

The clinical diagnostic category of auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) encompasses a heterogenous group of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Potential differences across children and adults with ANSD include three different sites of lesion in the auditory system, varying etiologies, different ages of onset and variability in auditory skills. The inherent heterogeneity of this group of patients presents challenges regarding management or remediation decisions and precludes a "one-size-fits-all" approach. A thorough and deliberate multidisciplinary model is critical in what frequently turn out to be complex cases when the diagnosis of ANSD is present. This session will review the test results needed for appropriate diagnosis of ANSD and will present a remediation approach that includes multiple options for mode of communication and for accessing auditory input. Case studies will be used to illustrate the decision-making process for this population.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to list the procedures included in an appropriate test battery for diagnosis of ANSD and describe the characteristic audiological findings one would see in a patient with this hearing disorder upon completion of a com, discuss appropriate options for auditory intervention in individuals diagnosed with ANSD, describe outcomes presented in the literature for this population for both hearing aids and cochlear implants, summarize the reasons why cochlear implantation is as beneficial in many cases involving ANSD as it is in patients with sensorineural hearing loss, explain instances in which a patient with a diagnosis of ANSD would not be considered a good candidate for, and outline a step-wise protocol for management in cases ANSD that assists in decision-making for remediation.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

3:15 pm - 4:15 pm

Session 47 - Delayed Hearing Loss in Hybrid Cochlear Implant Users

Rachel Scheperle, PhD, AuD, Montclair State University

This presentation will review longitudinal data in 85 individuals receiving cochlear implants designed to preserve acoustic hearing at the University of Iowa. Unaided behavioral audiometric thresholds, electrode impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential amplitude growth functions were used to characterize longitudinal changes in auditory status. Participants were grouped into two primary categories based on audiometric thresholds: (1) stable hearing or symmetrical hearing loss and (2) delayed loss of hearing in the implanted ear. Thirty-eight percent of this sample presented with delayed-onset hearing loss of various degrees and rates of change. The primary finding was that electrode impedance increased abruptly for many individuals exhibiting precipitous hearing loss; the increase was often transient. The impedance increases were significantly larger than the impedance changes observed for individuals with stable or symmetrical hearing loss. Moreover, the timing of the impedance changes were related to the timing of the changes in behavioral thresholds. These findings suggest a change in the electrode environment coincident with the change in auditory status. Changes in evoked compound action potential (ECAP) thresholds, growth function slopes and suprathreshold amplitudes were not correlated with changes in behavioral thresholds, suggesting that neural responsiveness in the region excited by the implant is relatively stable. Further exploration into etiology of delayed-onset hearing loss post implantation is needed, with particular interest in mechanisms associated with changes in the intracochlear environment.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to describe general candidacy criteria for hybrid cochlear implants, list at least three proposed mechanisms for loss of acoustic hearing following cochlear implantation, list two hearing preservation devices currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

.1 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

3:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Session 48 - School Affairs Update

Nicole Ford, MS, CCC-SLP, NJSHA SAC Chair

NJSHA's School Affairs Committee (SAC) works year round to serve and support the interests of school-based speech-language pathologists and audiologists. This informative session will provide a brief overview of NJSHA with a specific focus on SAC. It will address important and timely topics such as proposed changes to the New Jersey fiscal code as it applies to salary increases for speech-language specialists working in approved private special education schools; the New Jersey Tiered System of Supports which will roll out in September 2017; the reauthorization of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), known as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) with specific attention to the language changes pertaining to the school-based speech-language pathologist (SLP); and SAC's input relative to legislative bills A783 and A931. There will be a brief question and answer at the end of the session.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to discuss critical issues relative to the provision of speech-language services in the schools, understand the re-authorization of IDEA, known as ESSA and the specific changes pertinent to school-based SLPs.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Session 49 - Healthcare Update: Keeping Up With the Changing Times

Kathleen Palatucci, MA, CCC-SLP, Montclair State University; Barbara Schwerin-Bohus, MS, CCC-SLP, Hackensack University Hospital; Lynn Nowak, Porzio Governmental Affairs; Linda Tucker-Simpson, MS, CCC-SLP, University Hospital

This session will explore current state and federal legislation impacting the delivery of healthcare services in New Jersey. Discussion will include changes to the Affordable Care Act. A review of federal regulations will be provided pertaining to Medicare's Quality Payment Program including alternative payment models (APMs) and the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). Detailed information to assist clinicians in the field will be provided. Reports related to early intervention and pertinent healthcare updates from the 2017 ASHA Advisory Council meetings will be presented. An open forum for questions and discussion of topics related to healthcare will conclude the session.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify two New Jersey bills which impact delivery of speech-language pathology and audiology services, name federal healthcare legislation and describe the impact on clinical care, identify two current issues in the provision of early intervention services, understand changes in Medicare reimbursement related to bundled payment models versus fee for service.

.2 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

4:15 pm - 5:15 pm

Session 50 - Audiology Update

Joan Besing, PhD, CCC-A, NJSHA Audiology Chair

.1 CEUs, (Instructional Level – Intermediate)

Review and discussion of current issues in audiology in New Jersey and at the national level.

At the completion of this session, participants will be able to identify key legislative issues facing New Jersey audiologists, understand the history and specific issues of single licensure, recognize and learn about the roll and activities of the audiology committee.

2015 New Jersey Speech-Language-Hearing Association | All rights reserved.